Alas – A Villanelle (Reposted)

ALAS: A VILLANELLE*

Alas, I bring no stardust home tonight.
The sky is overcast and all is maya,
For I confess I see no hope in sight;

Where once each daybreak promised fresh delight
We only found that time had proved a liar.
Alas, I bring no stardust home tonight.

These poor neglected coals cast little light,
So place another log upon the fire,
For I confess I see no hope in sight.

The wind is chill and bitter; hold me tight
And stoke the fire till the flames climb higher.
Alas, I bring no stardust home tonight.

Let’s not apportion blame or rue what might.
How can we but accept the trundling gyre?
For I confess I see no hope in sight.

In impasse let us yet remain polite;
Offer comfort, even as our dreams expire.
Alas, I bring no stardust home tonight,
For I confess I see no hope in sight.

——————————————————————

* http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/5796

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About Ben Naga

Pilgrim on the lam. Please feel free to explore the links to learn more. I trust you will find some things there will have been worth the effort. See you there.

Posted on February 1, 2015, in Villanelle and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 15 Comments.

  1. Oh, I love this! I adore the rhyming scheme. Plaudits to any poet who can write so well within such a rigid form. It reminds me of auld Lang syne a little. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  2. A fine poem to start my day.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I have found out a long time ago that skill with metre and rhyme in this modern age is not in fashion. If you wish to be published write free verse! But oh, how I love the rhythms and sounds of a well-written Villanelle! Or sonnet! Or even epic.
    This is a wonderfully well-done Villanelle, Ben Naga. It sings, and the refrain woven throughout,
    “Alas, I bring no stardust home tonight”
    sings into the music and tension of the poem.
    There is a sense of despair here:
    “For I confess I see no hope in sight”
    and regret
    “Where once each daybreak promised fresh delight”
    But also a sense of acceptance:
    “Let’s not apportion blame or rue what might.
    How can we but accept the trundling gyre?”
    and a deep wisdom:
    “In impasse let us yet remain polite;
    Offer comfort, even as our dreams expire.”
    Getting old is not for cowards, as the saying says. As the inevitable march of time goes on, the future becomes the present, then, as in my mother’s case, the past. Dreams have expired; our lives reach an impasse. Still, “let us yet remain polite.” Yes, give us that at least:
    “Alas, I bring no stardust home tonight,
    For I confess I see no hope in sight.”
    Although, of course, even the admission that stardust can be brought home is an admission of hope, I suspect, even if the time of the possibility for bringing stardust home has passed.

    Liked by 1 person

    • In composing this what I had in mind was a love which has run its course, although neither partner is eager to let it go. But you are of course correct in seeing that it can just as well describe ageing and death.

      Like

  4. The state of mind and inside feelings bring us through the spaces the words of your poem speak. It is a good motion, a rhythm that calls home the poetic story you tell. There are many stories and many ways to release our creative experiences and what grows in our imagination. Love your style. Love your poem.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Your writing has a way of touching the delicate reaches of the mind. It is a a flower trusting and opening for all to see the beauty or depth that is within. You have a great depth within.

    Liked by 1 person

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